• Constitutional Law Research at Notre Dame

    Faculty engages foundational questions of constitutional structure.

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  • Notre Dame Program of Study in Public Law

    A foundational course of study for students interested in constitutional law.

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  • NDLS LL.M. Students Win Regional Moot Court Competition

    Four Notre Dame Law School students from the LL.M. program in International Human Rights Law recently won the Americas regional round of the Price Media Law Moot Court Competition

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Welcome to the Program on Constitutional Structure

Randy Kozel

Welcome to the Notre Dame Law School Program on Constitutional Structure. Our Program helps Notre Dame law students obtain a world-class education in constitutional law. We host events at our South Bend and London campuses to examine pressing constitutional questions of domestic and global importance. We serve federal and state courts by educating first-rate judicial law clerks, attorneys, and other public servants.

Our mission is to advance interdisciplinary learning about how sound constitutional structures of government advance individual well-being and the common good. We support curricular programs of study, sponsor academic lectures and conferences, and engage with questions of constitutional development worldwide. By promoting the study of constitutional structures, we serve the needs of our students, the broader academic community, and the bench and bar—here and abroad.

Learn more here about our Program, including our students and faculty, our Public Law Program of Study, upcoming events, and faculty research. And then contact us and let us know if we can serve you.

News

Associate Dean Randy Kozel develops a theory of precedent in new book

In the American legal system, it’s a generally accepted view that judges should not disrupt the decisions of their predecessors unless they have a compelling reason to do so. The principle is known by the Latin phrase stare decisis – “to stand by things decided.” The goal is to preserve the law’s core without permanently entrenching every judicial mistake.

The key question is: When should judges break from precedent? After all, even Supreme Court justices disagree about the role of precedent in particular cases.

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Events

Mon Sep 18, 2017

Tue Nov 21, 2017

Clynes Chair Lecture - Cass Sunstein

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Location: McCartan Courtroom

Cass Sunstein, the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard Law School, will give a Clynes Chair lecture.  

Co-sponsored by the Program on Constitutional Structure.…

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